Bio

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Needle felting is the art of binding wool fibers together by poking specialized barbed needles repeatedly into the wool. This process takes lofty, beautiful raw wool and condenses it down into a more solid, stable form while retaining its softness and elasticity.

Jodie is a needle felting artist who has a fond weakness for the innate character of the human face.

                                       “A face can reveal so much of one’s life story,

                                     both physically and emotionally; it’s strengths

                                            and weaknesses, blessings, and sorrows.”

It is with each rhythmic poke of the needle into wool that Jodie strives to capture the personality and story that lies within. Focusing primarily on the face and bust leaves the body and its embellishments open to repurposed treasure, nicely incorporating Jodie’s love of “thrifting” into her art.

Born in Nelson, B.C, Jodie says: “Growing up in a small town in the ’60s and ’70s certainly contributed to my character and story pool.” Yearly visits back home replenish these creative resources. From an early age, Jodie has been drawn to natural materials to create with – a throwback to the days spent gardening with her grandpa Pete. The sweet smell of the earth, it’s warmth between her fingers and toes, inspired her interest in pottery. After moving to Vancouver in her early 20s, Jodie pursued a Diploma in Ceramics at Capilano College and her love of sculpting was born. Experimentation in various materials led Jodie to her current works of sculpting in wool – a perfect marriage of sculpting the human face with natural materials.

 

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An emerging self-taught, artist, Jodie’s work can be found in the “Coastal Reflections” gift shop and gallery in Lunenburg, N.S. and in various private collections across Canada. Jodie has also taught Art Doll classes at the Continuing Education level through Capilano University and hopes to do more teaching in the future.

Jodie lives in quaint Edgemont Village in North Vancouver, B.C., a place that allows her to stay as close to her small town roots as possible while living in the big city.